The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire’s Foster Gallery presents the Spring 2020 Bachelor of Fine Arts Virtual Exhibition. This exhibition features work by May 2020 Bachelor of Fine Arts degree candidates Sarah Jo Ferraro, Katie Mattis, Payton Sullivan, and Jake Taylor.

Sarah Jo Ferraro is a photography BFA candidate from Edgerton, WI. Sarah Jo will be exhibiting a multimedia installation that includes textiles, video, sculpture, light, and poetry. Sarah writes, “I would describe the installation as a fantasy bedroom. Yayoi Kusama really influences my work because creating her “obsessive” artwork is also a way for her to deal with sexual trauma. My work is heavily influenced by intersectional feminism. I put my pain into words, films, fabric, etc. and try to make them shine in a way that is healing.”

Katie Mattis is a ceramic BFA candidate from Hudson, WI. She is exhibiting 10 functional ceramic works varying from teapots to a chess set. Katie writes, “My work is precise and clean. I am inspired by nature and other artists such as Martha Grover, S.C Rolf, and Deborah Schwarzkopf. My work is largely functional pieces, often kitchenware. I often combine natural textures with bright colors, adding a whimsical look to my pieces.”

Payton Sullivan is an illustration BFA candidate from Racine, WI. Payton is exhibiting two series of works that are digital paintings. The first is a portrait series about the history of a few women in Hollywood. It connects beauty and the portrayal of women in film from a historical stance. The second series is about the relationship between different animals. It gives the viewer an insight into the lives of wildlife and their unique interactions with one another. Payton writes, “I tend to draw realistically more often than not because it requires me to acknowledge every detail."

Jake Taylor is a ceramic BFA candidate from Verona, WI. Jake’s work includes sculptural ceramic forms juxtaposed with large format high definition macro photographs of glaze details. Inspired by symbols found in traditional Kanji and Pre-Islamic Arabic, Jake used language to create his pieces and compliments the forms with an intricate study of surface glazes. He writes, “My work is driven by the concept of controlled fluidity. Throughout the entire process from wet clay to fired work there are isolated moments of spontaneous creation.” 

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