Why-it-is-dangerous-to-use-hacked-programs-q

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license key to vfxAlert

Hacked programs contain "logic bombs". Most economic programs are protected and are delivered together with electronic keys. Many users perceive the keys as a foreign body designed to protect the program from illegal replication and increase the income of developers. Therefore, many people are tempted to use hacked versions distributed on pirated disks or via the Internet. And this is where the main danger arises. Before getting to pirated disks, the protected product must be hacked. Protected programs are usually hacked in two ways - by "biting" the security modules (i.e. making changes to the program body) and emulating the functions of electronic keys. It is very difficult to correctly remove the protection and "clean" the program. There is too great a risk that the intruder "touched" something or did not notice it. Because of this, hacked programs, as a rule, do not work correctly. Moreover, this is not revealed immediately, but at the most inopportune and very crucial moments, for example, when preparing a report or submitting a balance sheet.



In addition, many developers put special "bookmarks" for illegal users - time mines. When a hacker opens a new version of the program, some of the protective functions "sleep" and it can be very difficult to detect them. When a hacked program gets to users and they begin to actively exploit it, then after some time it begins to "fool", giving out, for example, data on the screen in rubles, and printing in bunnies or in tugriks. Using different key emulators is no less dangerous. Emulators contain errors that lead to unstable operation and system crash, often with data loss. Emulators disrupt the work of other "honest" products. If an emulator was once used on the machine, then even after removing it, the legal program may not work. Emulators contain "bookmarks" and "logic bombs" for those users who will not accept the rules of the hacker's game and will not pay him periodically for "fixing" the program. But the main danger of using hacked and pirated programs is that during hacking, special spy modules that collect a certain type of information (which, obviously, can be sold well) often began to be implanted in the program body (or in the emulator).




Such modules, as a rule, "know" the database formats of many popular financial, accounting and mail systems. After some time, they begin to imperceptibly send this information to their "owners". Who are these "owners"? And how will they manage your customer bases, information about the state of your warehouses and inventory, information about your financial and commodity flows? And will they not feel a sense of injustice at the sight of some discrepancy between your fiscal statements and the real state of affairs? So: Emulators contain "bookmarks" and "logic bombs" for those users who will not accept the rules of the hacker's game. A hacker is not a patron of the arts in order to distribute his works without control. He methodically teaches people to use hacked products for free, waits until people get used to it, accumulate more data, when they will have nowhere to go later. And here, please pay $200. But it doesn't end there. If the user paid once, then why won't he pay the second or third time? Hackers put such people "on the needle" and begin to "milk". Emulators disrupt the work of other "honest" products. If an emulator was once used on the machine, then even after its "demolition", the legal program may not work. Emulators contain errors that lead to unstable operation and system crash, often with data loss. Over the past six months, we have come across several cracks on pirated disks, which, after some time, initiate the work of "Trojans" that send databases of some well-known financial systems by mail. Dangerous stuff. And the guys have grown up.